RPCI Cancer Talk

Tuesday, November 5, 2013 - 12:29pm

Looking at the most recent cancer data released by the New York State Cancer Registry and the CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (2006-10), it appears that some counties in the Western New York area have higher-than-average breast cancer incidence rates when

Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 7:44am

As we approach the fall harvest traditions and holidays like Halloween and Thanksgiving, we thought we’d offer up a fun, delicious way to get a boost of vitamin A in a tasty, cool and refreshing treat: a pumpkin banana smoothie.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 8:43am

Melanoma and soft tissue cancers are diseases in which prognosis is highly dependent on stage. Ninety to ninety-five percent of patients with early stage I diagnoses are completely cured with non-invasive treatment.

Friday, October 25, 2013 - 9:07am

In Roswell Park’s Genetics Services Center we meet with people who have personal and family histories of cancer.

Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 9:43am

A topic of much debate nationally for years has been the role of “active surveillance” or what used to be called “watchful waiting” for many men diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 - 11:11am

Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) and the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) were recently awarded an $11 million Ovarian Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) grant.

Monday, October 7, 2013 - 11:43am

Very soon, our local farmers’ markets will be switching out their seasonal offerings.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013 - 7:33am

Following breast cancer removal by lumpectomy, whole breast irradiation is commonly required. We know that when breast cancer cells return after surgical removal, they often recur in the area where the tumor was removed.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - 9:26am

The numbers don’t lie. Approximately 1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their life, and 1 in 36 will die as a result of the disease.

Monday, September 23, 2013 - 2:34pm

Women with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer have an increased risk of developing these diseases. Sometimes this strong family history indicates a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, making the odds of developing these cancers even higher.