What we do

The Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center Hematologic Procurement Bank (formerly known as the Leukemia Tissue Bank and a part of the Pathology Network Shared Resource) provides investigators with appropriately procured and cryopreserved samples of bone marrow and peripheral blood cells, DNA, RNA, and serum/plasma samples from patients with hematological malignancies treated at Roswell Park.

Available hematologic samples

The bank contains more than 100,000 cryopreserved marrow and blood samples from patients with hematological malignancies dating from the present back to 1991 linked to a clinical database. The majority of samples are from patients with acute leukemia.

Approximately 70,300 samples from 1,550 individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 11,700 samples from 260 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are currently stored in this shared resource.

Samples from patients with myeloid malignancies, chronic leukemias, lymphoproliferative diseases, multiple myeloma, and other hematological disorders are also available.

The bank also contracts with Clinical Research Services to procure, process and store correlative peripheral blood and other biological samples on patients with a variety of solid and hematological malignancies who are receiving investigational treatment on cancer clinical trials.

Hematologic procurement equipment

Open configuration options

  • Allegra 6R Refrigerated Centrifuge
  • Labnet Tabletop Centrifuge
  • Beckman Coulter Tabletop
  • Z1 Coulter Counter
  • Prism Microfuge
  • ThermoCryoPlus3 LN2 Freezers
  • -80 Freezers
  • Sanyo -30 Freezer
  • Hera Cell Incubator
  • Cytospin 2
  • BioGard Hood

Services & fees

For project pricing please request a quote by contacting us.

Central processing of peripheral blood (PB), plasma, serum and bone marrow (BM) samples from normal donors and patients with hematological cancers:

  • Isolation of PB/BM mononuclear cells
  • Cryopreserved cells

Primary patient samples are characterized by the following:

  • Multiple sample availability: plasma, serum, viable cells, DNA, RNA, protein on request
  • De-identified clinical information on samples include: diagnosis, pathology, karyotype, mutational profile, treatment (chemotherapy regimen, response, relapse), age and gender
  • Sequential samples/multiple vials available on select patients - DNA/RNA/protein

Samples for cancer clinical trials:

  • Serial timed PK samples of drugs
  • Correlative PD labs
  • Investigator initiated research samples
  • Services available 24/7 and on weeknights and weekends with prior approval and budgeting
  • Samples are processed, stored and shipped to outside laboratories/sponsors on request

Meet our team

Linda Lutgen
Supervising Pathology Resource Specialist

Brandon Martens
Procurement Technician

Tara Cronin
Data Manager I

Joseph Moberg
Procurement Technician

Contact us

For more information or to request a quote, contact:

Linda Lutgen, BS
Supervising Pathology Resource Specialist
Phone: 716-845-8098
Email: Linda.Lutgen@RoswellPark.org

For individuals:

Eunice Wang, MD
Phone: 716-845-3544
Email: Eunice.Wang@RoswellPark.org

Brandon Martens
Phone: 716-845-8098
Email: Brandon.Martens@RoswellPark.org

Tara Cronin
Phone: 716-845-6463
Email: Tara.Cronin@roswellpark.org

Joseph Moberg
Phone: 716-845-8098
Email: Joseph.Moberg@RoswellPark.org

Image
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Location & hours

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
Hematologic Procurement Shared Resource
Gratwick Basic Science Building, Room 524
Elm and Carlton Streets
Buffalo, New York 14263, USA

Monday – Friday, 7 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Content for grants

This shared resource is funded by NCI P30CA16056. Publications should cite the core grant in the acknowledgment section, if publications use data generated by the shared resource. Two copies of the publication acknowledging the Core grant should also be submitted to the facility at Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263.

The Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center Hematologic Procurement Shared Resource (formerly known as the Leukemia Tissue Bank) provides researchers and investigators with appropriately procured and cryopreserved samples of bone marrow and peripheral blood cells, DNA, RNA, and serum/plasma samples from patients with hematological malignancies treated at our institute.

Presently, the HTF contains over 100,000 cryopreserved marrow and blood samples from patients with hematological malignancies dating from the present back to 1991 linked to a clinical database.

The majority of samples are from patients with acute leukemia. Approximately 70,300 samples from 1,550 individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 11,700 samples from 260 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are currently stored in this shared resource.

Samples from patients with myeloid malignancies, chronic leukemias, lymphoproliferative diseases, multiple myeloma, and other hematological disorders are also available.

Personnel include a physician-scientist director, a lab manager, two full-time research technician/technologists and a clinical database manager. Staffing is available after hours and on weekends for sample procurement and processing.

The shared resource also contracts with Clinical Research Services to procure and store correlative biological samples for patients being treated on numerous clinical trials throughout the Institute.

The square footage of the lab where primary patient samples are processed is 488.16 ft. The core has ten large LN2 freezers, one small LN2 freezer, three -80°C stand up freezers, three -20°C stand-up freezers and one fridge/freezer. All freezers are on the Rees system. The core also has one 6 ft hood, one coulter counter, two refrigerated centrifuges and one non-refrigerated. In addition, the core has a water bath and micro-centrifuge.

Publications

  • Guo Y, Bosompem A, Mohan S, Erdogan B, Ye F, Vickers KC, Sheng Q, Zhao S, Li CI, Su PF, Jagasia M, Strickland SA, Griffiths EA, Kim AS. Transfer RNA detection by small RNA deep sequencing and disease association with myelodysplastic syndromes. BMC Genomics. 2015 Sep 24;16:727. doi: 10.1186/s12864-015-1929-y. PMID: 26400237; PMCID: PMC4581457.
  • Krönke J, Fink EC, Hollenbach PW, MacBeth KJ, Hurst SN, Udeshi ND, Chamberlain PP, Mani DR, Man HW, Gandhi AK, Svinkina T, Schneider RK, McConkey M, Järås M, Griffiths E, Wetzler M, Bullinger L, Cathers BE, Carr SA, Chopra R, Ebert BL. Lenalidomide induces ubiquitination and degradation of CK1α in del(5q) MDS. Nature. 2015 Jul 9;523(7559):183-188. doi: 10.1038/nature14610. Epub 2015 Jul 1. PMID: 26131937; PMCID: PMC4853910.
  • Emadi A, Faramand R, Carter-Cooper B, Tolu S, Ford LA, Lapidus RG, Wetzler M, Wang ES, Etemadi A, Griffiths EA. Presence of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations may predict clinical response to hypomethylating agents in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Am J Hematol. 2015 May;90(5):E77-9. doi: 10.1002/ajh.23965. Epub 2015 Feb 27. PMID: 25651001.
  • Griffiths EA, Golding MC, Srivastava P, Povinelli BJ, James SR, Ford LA, Wetzler M, Wang ES, Nemeth MJ. Pharmacological targeting of β-catenin in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia blasts. Haematologica. 2015 Feb;100(2):e49-52. doi: 10.3324/haematol.2014.113118. Epub 2014 Nov 7. PMID: 25381132; PMCID: PMC4803144.
  • Srivastava P, Paluch BE, Matsuzaki J, James SR, Collamat-Lai G, Karbach J, Nemeth MJ, Taverna P, Karpf AR, Griffiths EA. Immunomodulatory action of SGI-110, a hypomethylating agent, in acute myeloid leukemia cells and xenografts. Leuk Res. 2014 Nov;38(11):1332-41. doi: 10.1016/j.leukres.2014.09.001. Epub 2014 Sep 10. PMID: 25260825; PMCID: PMC5584559.
  • Lee HJ, Muindi JR, Tan W, Hu Q, Wang D, Liu S, Wilding GE, Ford LA, Sait SN, Block AW, Adjei AA, Barcos M, Griffiths EA, Thompson JE, Wang ES, Johnson CS, Trump DL, Wetzler M. Low 25(OH) vitamin D3 levels are associated with adverse outcome in newly diagnosed, intensively treated adult acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer. 2014 Feb 15;120(4):521-9. doi: 10.1002/cncr.28368. Epub 2013 Oct 25. PMID: 24166051; PMCID: PMC3948325.

Abstracts

  • Feurstein S, Churpek JE, Walsh T, Keel S, Hakkarainen M, Schroeder T, Germing U, Geyh S, Heuser M, Thol F, Pohlkamp C, Haferlach T, Gao J, Owen C, Goehring G, Schlegelberger B, Verma D, Krause DS, Gao G, Cronin T, Gulsuner S, Lee M, Pritchard CC, Subramanian HP, del Gaudio D, Li Z, Das S, Kilpivaara O, Wartiovaara-Kautto U, Wang ES, Griffiths EA, Döhner K, Döhner H, King M-C, Godley LA. Germline variants drive myelodysplastic syndrome in young adults. Leukemia, accepted (2021).
  • Ho T-C, Jordan CT, LaMere MW, Ashton JM, O'Dwyer, K, Mendler JH, Liesveld JL, Wang ES, Guzman ML, Calvi LM, Becker MW. A Role for IL1RAP in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Stem Cells Following Treatment and Progression. Poster presentation at the American Society of Hematology annual meeting, Orlando, FL, December 2015.
  • Griffiths EA, Carter-Cooper B, Ford LA, Lapidus RG, Wetzler M, Wang ES, Etemadi A, Emadi A. Presence of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations may predict clinical response to hypomethylating agents in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). American Society of Hematology annual meeting, San Francisco, CA, poster presentation, December 2014.