Pediatric Cancer

Children with brain tumors or with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are most likely to have late effects in the brain, but any child treated for cancer is at a higher risk for learning disabilities, memory loss and social distress.

When eight-year-old Luke Gworek flips a switch during Roswell Park’s 2014 Tree of Hope celebration, nearly 75,000 lights will flash to music and shine from a towering tree in Kaminski Park. He can’t wait for the evening to arrive.

I was diagnosed with cancer in the middle of my college career. Since then, I have relapsed three times. After treatment, it’s always really difficult to return to a normal routine.

I have worked as a pediatric hematology and oncology nurse at Roswell Park for twenty years. I am also an active member of the Western New York Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON).

The types of cancers that develop in children are different from those that develop in adults. Take a closer look at the top five cancers found in children and the warning signs for each.