Pediatric Cancer

Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 4:31pm

During your teenage years, physical changes are a part of normal development. You may notice a difference in the way your body looks, feels and performs. But for teen cancer survivors, these changes are especially difficult.

Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 1:06pm

Children with brain tumors or with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are most likely to have late effects in the brain, but any child treated for cancer is at a higher risk for learning disabilities, memory loss and social distress.

Friday, December 5, 2014 - 2:07pm

When eight-year-old Luke Gworek flips a switch during Roswell Park’s 2014 Tree of Hope celebration, nearly 75,000 lights will flash to music and shine from a towering tree in Kaminski Park. He can’t wait for the evening to arrive.

Friday, September 12, 2014 - 1:01pm

I was diagnosed with cancer in the middle of my college career. Since then, I have relapsed three times. After treatment, it’s always really difficult to return to a normal routine.

Saturday, September 7, 2013 - 11:00am

I have worked as a pediatric hematology and oncology nurse at Roswell Park for twenty years. I am also an active member of the Western New York Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON).

Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 3:22pm

The types of cancers that develop in children are different from those that develop in adults. Lifestyle or environmental risk factors don’t play a role. Instead, it’s usually the result of DNA changes in cells that take place very early in life.

Friday, September 21, 2012 - 1:22pm

While there is no way to fully prepare for a cancer diagnosis, it's important to pay attention to any warning signs and recognize symptoms.