Cancer Support

“The evidence shows that acupuncture works really well to help with side effects, including digestive issues and neuropathy in the hands and feet.”
“A new patient is usually very shell-shocked and sometimes that will last for the few first visits. We’re the support people."
“This is a great way to connect with people, especially right now, when I feel like connecting with people is difficult. We’re not meeting too many strangers right now during COVID-19. It allows individuals to really express themselves.”
“Sometimes sickness can play life’s roll of film on a fast track. Looking at art, in my opinion, brings that feeling to a halt and helps each frame come alive.”
For someone undergoing treatment for cancer, or who has finished treatment but still takes extra precautions to stay safe, the question looms large: How do I handle the holidays?

If you’re about to enter cancer treatment, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Physical Therapy (PT) team may provide part of your care.

No one expects to get cancer. But when someone you love says they’ve got breast cancer, what do you do? 
Cancer and cancer treatments can increase the chances of serious injury from even a minor fall. Why? Because you may be at higher risk for bleeding (including internal bleeding) and a weakened immune system (which means even a small cut can allow a serious infection to take hold). Here's how to safeguard against falling.
It’s OK to feel the feelings you have, it’s OK to be sad, but don’t dwell on it. Positivity breeds positivity. Attitude is everything.
The heat, sun and outside activities can present challenges and trigger side effects. Take these precautions to stay safe.

Single dad Chris Bosley is currently in his second monthlong stay at Roswell Park for treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). During his first hospitalization, back in December, he saw his parents every day and, best of all, his son three times a week.

“The overall enjoyment of life.” This is how the National Cancer Institute defines quality of life. But when you are a cancer patient and you are in pain, afraid, worried about your family and finances, or unable to do the things that make you happy, can you really enjoy life?