Cancer Research

“Look what we’ve started. This is so exciting.”

“We have to be really careful about health and diet and exercise, and keeping lean. If glucose can drive cancer growth, then patients with esophageal cancer probably have to be careful about their diet, their glucose intake, and make sure they're speaking to their medical professionals to get advice.”

In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka, a Japanese stem cell researcher, made a groundbreaking discovery that would win him the Nobel Prize. Yamanaka discovered a new way to turn adult, dividing cells into pluripotent stem cells.

The mission of cancer research – to find better and more effective ways to treat or prevent cancer – begins with a better understanding of the disease. Knowing how a cancer begins and how it grows is an important first step toward fighting it and has led to remarkable advances in oncology.

Dr. Wang and her Roswell Park colleagues travel the world to identify new clinical trials for leukemia for our patients at Roswell Park. "Our patients should have access to the same trials as patients in Boston, New York, Chicago and San Francisco."

One of Dr. Guru's goals was to use the gallery as a laboratory, to determine scientifically whether viewing artwork could help patients heal physically, psychologically and emotionally after cancer surgery.

"When I walk into the gallery and connect with a work of art, it becomes a spiritual experience for me."
Concerns have been raised worldwide about whether chemicals used for growing crops can increase the risk of cancer. Is it time to go organic?

Overall, the results showed that patients who exercised regularly both before and after their diagnosis had a significantly lower risk of death (40%) compared with patients who didn't exercise.

Not necessarily. Elevated CA-125 (a protein in the blood that’s associated with ovarian cancer) is most often caused by common, ordinary or benign conditions such as uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, endometriosis — or even just having your period.

It was 2005, and 47-year-old Rick Crowley had a lump growing in his neck. The first biopsy indicated that it was benign, but his doctors in Olean, New York, were not convinced. A good thing, too: The second biopsy found cancer.

Dr. Odunsi and his colleagues observed that the tumors of some patients were full of T cells that had managed to work their way inside the tumor. When there were many of these T cells, the patients tended to live longer.