Leukemia

Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 2:24pm
Watchful waiting is a treatment approach that may be recommended in certain situations for certain types of cancer, including some blood cancers. While this method may seem frightening, understanding the reasoning and science behind it can help to ease your fears.  
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 - 9:37am
When Dr. Donald Pinkel graduated from medical school at the University of Buffalo in 1951, the world was a pretty dark place for kids with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). They didn’t live long after diagnosis, and experts in the field of blood cancer were convinced the disease was incurable.
Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 1:36pm
My early twenties were everything I imagined they would be. They were fun, filled with life and discovery, naive in the best of ways, connected by travels, and laced with endless dreams. This was until I hit a road block at age 25. Cancer stood in my tracks. What was I to do?
Monday, April 25, 2016 - 3:42pm
People with Down syndrome have an increased risk of developing very specific types of childhood leukemia, but Eugene Yu, PhD, has an additional reason to focus on the genetic mysteries of Down syndrome.
Monday, February 29, 2016 - 2:53pm
One day in 1955, Dr. James Grace’s two-year-old son, Jimmy, spiked a fever of 105°. It was the first sign that the little boy had acute leukemia — a fast-moving disease that in those days had no hope of a cure. When his son died only a few months later, Dr. Grace converted his pain to passion.
Friday, July 31, 2015 - 11:39am
For patients with leukemia, lymphoma, and other blood cancers, a blood or marrow transplant can be a potential cure. But when the transplant uses marrow or blood stem cells from a donor, it can have two effects — one harmful and the other helpful.
Friday, May 8, 2015 - 3:37pm

“There he is – there’s my brother!” says Phil Richiuso, spotting the #18 FC Dallas jersey during a Major League Soccer game on TV. Richiuso doesn’t know much about professional soccer. And #18, goalkeeper Chris Seitz, isn’t really related to the 57-year-old man from Erie, PA.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 8:10am

Down syndrome is one of the most well-known and common chromosomal disorders—there are approximately 400,000 people in the United States with the condition, also known as trisomy 21.