Prostate Cancer

​​​​​​​One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in his life, but not all men with the disease will need to be treated for their illness.
One in five of those diagnosed with prostate cancer has a more aggressive form of the disease. Even before the individual has received any treatment or experienced a recurrence, doctors can identify whether the cancer is likely to be more dangerous and aggressive.

As we grow older, our risk of developing serious health issues, including cancer, also grows. For men, the risk of getting prostate cancer increases with age. Prostate cancer is rare in men under 40, and about 60% of cases are diagnosed in men aged 65 or older.

If your medical team determines that your prostate cancer has become aggressive and needs to be treated, an operation called radical prostatectomy — removal of the prostate — is typically the first-line treatment.

With the popularity of mail-away DNA tests and ancestry reports, people are learning more about what makes them who they are. Learning about your family history can be exciting, but this trend also has people curious about the health risks they may have inherited through family genetics.

You ask the internet a lot of questions, and Roswell Park has some answers. James Mohler, MD, Professor of Oncology, and Chair of the NCCN Prostate Cancer Guideline Committee, and Eric Kauffman, MD, Assistant Professor of Oncology, sat down to answer some of the internet's most-searched-for questions related to prostate cancer.

Participating in screening and early detection events is key to catching cancer early and we’re here to help you and those you love be proactive about their health.

As many as 50% of men over age 50 have prostate cancer. But, the majority of prostate cancers are found to be an unaggressive form of the disease.

Recognizing signs and symptoms of illness is always a good idea, but when it comes to cancer, and especially prostate cancer, symptoms are often vague, difficult to discern from normal, or don’t appear at all until the cancer advances.

How can prostate cancer treatment affect your ability to get an erection — and can the problem be corrected?

Every April, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center works to raise awareness about cancer among minority populations by recognizing National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, celebrated this year April 8-14, 2019.

It was 2005, and 47-year-old Rick Crowley had a lump growing in his neck. The first biopsy indicated that it was benign, but his doctors in Olean, New York, were not convinced. A good thing, too: The second biopsy found cancer.