Lung Cancer

On November 10, 2014 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a proposed decision to begin covering the cost of a promising type of

When diagnosing or treating cancer, a less-invasive procedure often leads to better outcomes and fewer risks.

When an oncologist creates a care plan for a cancer patient, we consider many aspects of the individual, including his or her age, other health problems and existing risk factors.

Some misconceptions about lung cancer exist and it can sometimes be difficult to separate myth from fact. It’s very important to maintain awareness and stay educated.

Cancer cells are smart. They adapt to defend against the drugs we use to treat them, and tumors can develop resistance to certain drugs over time. This can vary from patient to patient. Our research at Roswell Park is offering new ways to get around these issues.

At Roswell Park, my colleagues and I now perform over 90% of lung cancer surgeries with minimally invasive surgical techniques.

I am originally from Lebanon, and worked previously in New York, Maine and Pennsylvania. I am so pleased to be part of a thriving medical community at Roswell Park and to be caring for patients in the greater Buffalo region.

What is often most difficult in the general treatment of lung cancers is understanding the specific complexities of each unique case. For decades, doctors and the medical community alike have lumped all lung cancers together as one entity.

When thinking about lung cancer and its risk factors, it’s natural to immediately think about smoking. However, there are other forms of lung cancer and, with them, other risk factors. Mesothelioma is a rare, but serious, lung cancer heavily linked with exposure to asbestos.

This Veterans Day, we join with the Lung Cancer Alliance (LCA) and Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) to honor our veteran

As we head into the month of November, Lung Cancer Awareness Month, I want to share some facts about the deadliest cancer in the United States. Lung cancer kills more people than colon, prostate, and breast cancer combined.

Ever wonder if the neighbor smoking in the apartment next door could be doing you harm? Andrew Hyland, PhD, explains findings of ongoing research at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center about the harmful effects of secondhand smoke in shared-living environments.