Lung Cancer

We know quitting is hard. Most smokers try several times to quit and it can be a very frustrating process. But every time you try, you practice quitting and increase your chances for quitting for good. So don’t give up – give it another try and ask for help.
"There was only one place I knew that could take good care of me, so I called up Roswell. They asked, 'Who referred you?' and I said, I did!"
Roswell Park is the only facility in Western New York that has both the technology and the expertise required to offer the treatment.
“Other than a shot once a month, I’m in no pain,“ Judi says. “Instead, I’ve already lived three years longer than I thought I would at the beginning of this diagnosis. I’m happy to be alive and feeling well, and one day, I hope to ring that Victory Bell at Roswell Park.”
A number of ailments can cause chest or back pain, some as simple as a strained muscle or seasonal allergy. It also could be a sign of a more serious condition like lung cancer.

Triggers — or reasons why someone wants to smoke, are different for everyone who is trying to quit smoking. Try these strategies to control some of the most common smoking triggers.

Sai Yendamuri, MD, FACS, Chair of Department of Thoracic Surgery and Grace Dy, MD, at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, sat down to answer some of the internet's most-searched-for questions related to lung cancer.

What does lung cancer feel like? Sometimes it doesn’t feel like anything at all.

Every April, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center works to raise awareness about cancer among minority populations by recognizing National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, celebrated this year April 8-14, 2019.

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. In the United States, more people die every year of lung cancer than of the other major cancers – breast, prostate and colon – combined.

We asked some of Roswell Park’s doctors who specialize in cancers that affect women to share some tips for preventing or treating cancer. Here’s what they offered.

Surgical advances, such as video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), have replaced the Chamberlain procedure and offer the surgeon a better way to examine the lungs, determine the extent of the disease and get higher-quality biopsies.