Healthy Living

Summertime is a bounty of delicious foods – grilled entrees, fresh fruits and vegetables from roadside stands, refreshing beverages in all the colors of the rainbow.
"The mission of the COE is to assure that all cancer patients and communities in Western New York can benefit from, and have access to, all the clinical and scientific advances accomplished at Roswell Park.” 
Dehydration can cause headaches, lethargy, muscle weakness and a host of other problems. So what is adequate hydration, and how do we meet these needs through drinking and eating?
Whether you’re lactose-intolerant, vegan or just looking to switch up your milk routine, milk alternatives can offer good nutrition profiles and different flavors to keep things interesting. The grocery store shelves can get a little overwhelming with all the different choices.
While one-third of the general population has insomnia symptoms, cancer patients and survivors are at increased risk for sleeping disorders due to symptoms and side effects of cancer and subsequent treatments.
Alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for developing cancers of the head & neck, esophagus, liver, breast, colon and rectum.

While some risk factors, including a genetic predisposition for disease, cannot be controlled, research has shown certain lifestyle factors, like a healthy diet, exercise and maintaining a healthy body weight, could prevent nearly half of the cases of colorectal cancers diagnosed in the United States every year.

Each of our frontline employees had special reasons for rolling up their sleeve to get the shot; here are some of their stories. 
The stress of being diagnosed with cancer and going through treatment makes for an overwhelming time for a patient.

Even if you already have cancer, you can’t let down your guard when it comes to prevention. In fact, cancer patients have even more reason to be on guard, because they usually have a higher risk for infection or developing other types of cancer.

Here are two ways of eating that can help you ditch the “dieting” approach and enjoy a healthy relationship with food.

"There's a lot of evidence that for someone who's overweight, losing even a small amount — five pounds, 10 pounds — can reduce the chances that they'll be diagnosed with cancer."