Chemotherapy

Sunday, April 9, 2017 - 2:39pm

Bloating. It’s one thing to feel overly full after a large celebratory meal, but unfortunately, for many patients in cancer treatment, bloating doesn’t come with a holiday, but instead is an unpleasant side effect of cancer therapy.  Bloating can be caused by slowed movement of food through the G.I. (gastrointestinal tract or digestive tract) tract due to gastric surgery, chemotherapy (also called chemo belly), radiation therapy or medications. Whatever the cause, the discomfort is universally not welcome.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 2:16pm

I remember it like it was yesterday. I left work to go to my doctor’s appointment and planned on being back to the office in time for a meeting. Little did I know my entire life would flip upside down that afternoon. I can still hear the doctor say those infamous three words, “you have cancer.” After that, it turned into a Peanuts cartoon when the adults are talking. Wahh, wahh, wahh…

Friday, November 18, 2016 - 4:20pm
In the United States, hair and beauty are multibillion-dollar industries, with the average woman spending about $50,000 on her hair over a lifetime. Clearly, good hair days are important and for most women, play a strong role in personal identity, self-confidence and the image presented to the world. So when patients begin treatment for cancer, the concern over hair loss sits front and center on the list of side effects that are likely to become an important part of their experience.
Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 8:00am

If you’re a woman under 40, you’re probably not thinking about menopause. But for young women who have had cancer, treatment-induced ovarian failure – often referred to as “chemopause” – is a very realistic concern.

Monday, July 25, 2016 - 4:01pm
When the contents of your stomach – food, stomach acid, enzymes, and bile – come up into your esophagus instead of going down into the intestines, you’ve got acid reflux. While your stomach can handle these harsh substances, they cause irritation, and over time, they can damage your esophagus.
Sunday, May 1, 2016 - 8:00am

Chemobrain or chemo fog is well known by cancer patients, but for years researchers struggled to find evidence of its existence. Today, it is widely recognized as a legitimate, diagnosable condition.

Monday, September 21, 2015 - 2:52pm

Delivering chemotherapy directly to the abdomen can significantly improve survival among women with ovarian cancer—so significantly that nearly ten years ago, the National Cancer Institute issued a special clinical announcement urging oncologists to use the approach, called intraperitonea

Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 4:04pm

I won't deny it, chemotherapy is tough. But during my time in the Chemo Infusion Center, I learned some tricks that helped me cope with treatment.