Chemotherapy

In the United States, hair and beauty are multibillion-dollar industries, with the average woman spending about $50,000 on her hair over a lifetime. Clearly, good hair days are important and for most women, play a strong role in personal identity, self-confidence and the image presented to the world. So when patients begin treatment for cancer, the concern over hair loss sits front and center on the list of side effects that are likely to become an important part of their experience.
If you’re a woman under 40, you’re probably not thinking about menopause. But for young women who have had cancer, treatment-induced ovarian failure – often referred to as “chemopause” – is a very realistic concern.
When the contents of your stomach – food, stomach acid, enzymes, and bile – come up into your esophagus instead of going down into the intestines, you’ve got acid reflux. While your stomach can handle these harsh substances, they cause irritation, and over time, they can damage your esophagus.

Chemobrain or chemo fog is well known by cancer patients, but for years researchers struggled to find evidence of its existence. Today, it is widely recognized as a legitimate, diagnosable condition.

Delivering chemotherapy directly to the abdomen can significantly improve survival among women with ovarian cancer—so significantly that nearly ten years ago, the National Cancer Institute issued a special clinical announcement urging oncologists to use the approach, called intraperitonea

I won't deny it, chemotherapy is tough. But during my time in the Chemo Infusion Center, I learned some tricks that helped me cope with treatment.