Young Adult Cancer

Adult women, starting at age 20, are encouraged to perform a breast self-exam at least once a month. The key to a successful self-exam is consistency.

Cancer patients and survivors struggle with a lot of tough questions. Will I be cured? Will I relapse? When will my body be back to normal? These are just some of the questions I think about on a daily basis, but they have an even stronger presence at the start of a new year.

I am 28 years old and I have a plastic surgeon, but it’s not the circumstance that one would want or hope for. After having a double mastectomy, my plastic surgeon and his medical team reconstructed a brand new chest for me.

There is a lack of expectation that young adults get cancer, yet it is the number one cause of disease-related death in this age group.
"But you're so young." These words have resonated loudly in my mind over and over again in the last year. Yes, statistically, a 28-year-old should be planning other major life events that do not include a double mastectomy, 16 rounds of chemotherapy, radiation, endocrine therapy, and several reconstructive surgeries.

At age seven, I was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. After my main surgery to remove the cancer, I had to go through weeks of chemotherapy and never stopped asking questions during the process.

I won't deny it, chemotherapy is tough. But during my time in the Chemo Infusion Center, I learned some tricks that helped me cope with treatment.
I was 24 years old and dating the man of my dreams. The first year of our relationship was perfect. But when I was 25, I started to get sick. I had monthly doctor’s appointments for an entire year to figure out what was wrong.

A complex and unexpected mix of emotions sometimes follows the end of cancer treatment. While you are relieved that your cancer is in remission, it’s normal to feel worried that the cancer could come back.

The Adolescent and Young Adult Program at Roswell Park recognizes the unique circumstances related to lifestyle, work, school, family life, and social development that AYAs face when living with cancer.

Every couple faces challenges throughout the course of a relationship, but nobody expects cancer to be one of them.

Being diagnosed with cancer is a very confusing experience. There is a lot of information to absorb in a short period of time and it’s easy to get overwhelmed. This is especially true for adolescents and young adults.