Young Adult Cancer

When she was almost 11, Kayla was mysteriously sick for two months. First her doctors thought she had a cold or mono, and then a stomach bug. Her blood work showed that her white blood cell count was through the roof.

What do you do when — after planning your life and working hard to achieve your dreams — your plans are interrupted by cancer?

“My first thought was that the news wasn’t real. I remember thinking there was no way I could have cancer. It doesn’t run in my family and everyone told me I’m too young,” says Racine.

Childhood cancer rates have been rising slightly: in the United States, 10,380 children under the age of 15 were diagnosed in 2016. And there are still a lot of unknowns about why children get cancer.
Weight management is by far the most personal part of my journey I’ve talked about so far. I can’t tell you how many hours I’ve spent elated or devastated reacting to the numbers on the scale and how they are represented on my body.
Let Halloween be your excuse to embrace your beautiful bald head. Make the most of your situation with one of these fun and easy Halloween costumes.

There are countless things to say about going through cancer treatment and testing, but in my experience, it’s the elements of survivorship that often go ignored or are put off to deal with at a later date.

For cancer patients, the threat of infertility is a common concern. Radiation, chemotherapy and surgery have the potential to impact fertility. That’s why it’s so important for young cancer patients to have a multidisciplinary team of cancer and fertility experts who can offer the most effective treatment and fertility preservation options.

A solid ten years of dreaming and planning finally came to fruition only to go up in flames thanks to a 30-minute doctor appointment on the Upper West Side. The culprit? Cancer.

In June, More than 50 local teen cancer survivors, patients and their guests enjoyed a night of dancing and fun at the fourth annual prom hosted by Carly’s Club, a social support program at Roswell Park.

Young adult survivor, J.G., shares his experience with testicular cancer and how the largest, annual young adult cancer convention helped him get his life back on track.

As a young adult cancer patient, I craved a sense of normality. Going to work every day helped me maintain my routine, and for 8 hours, I tricked myself into believing nothing was out of the ordinary.