Skin Cancer

Dr. Stenzel notes that dogs persistently sniffed, licked and nipped at melanoma lesions on their owners’ skin, even through clothing, prompting the owners to identify the cancerous sites and seek care from clinicians.
An estimated 25% of adults between the ages of 18 and 50 worldwide have at least one tattoo, adding up to millions of people with permanent skin art.
Even people who regularly check their skin as recommended often do not think of including their scalp.  It is important to have someone else check the scalp thoroughly on a regular basis.
Whether your summer plans include biking, fishing, swimming or just working in the garden, you’ll need to protect yourself from the sun’s ultraviolet rays — UVA (long wave) and UVB (short wave).

During the summer and warm weather season, it’s important to remember that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun can increase your risk of developing skin cancer.

Melanoma is the third most common form of skin cancer. While it is often described as the most deadly type, in 90-95% of cases, it is found early, treated quickly and cured.

The skin is the largest organ in the body, and skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. There are three main types of skin cancer: squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and melanoma. Of these, melanoma is the most dangerous.

Yes, you definitely do. While the cold winter months may not immediately bring to mind warmth and sunshine, ultraviolet (UV) rays still pose a risk and you need to apply sunscreen before heading outdoors, just like in the summer.

Because melanoma causes most skin cancer deaths in America — and the number continues to rise every year — you should understand what puts you at risk for the disease, how to lower your risk, and how to spot melanoma in its early stages, when it’s easier to treat.
Cuts, abrasions and even tiny cracks in the skin around our fingernails can create open doors for nasty germs. That risk is higher if you are in treatment.

In the age of digital information it can be hard to find trustworthy sources. For any given topic there's a countless number of blogs, articles or videos clamoring for your attention with flashy headlines.

Many things can cause an itch: dry skin, poison ivy and bug bites, to name a few. Typically skin cancer isn’t the first cause that comes to mind when you itch, but if the irritation persists, it might be something you want a dermatologist to look at.