Mammography

Breast cancer survivors, survivors of other types of cancer and people who have never had cancer all have different needs when it comes to breast cancer screening. Here’s what you need to know.

A series of botanical panels installed recently in the Mammography Center waiting room features plants used in traditional healing.

Of the millions of women who get their mammogram each year, the vast majority will be told that their results are normal. However, if you do have an abnormal screening mammogram, you will need to undergo further testing.

On a mammogram, fat looks dark grey or black whereas breast tissue looks white. That white area can be an issue because many small breast cancers also appear as white, so it’s harder to detect them in dense breasts.

Advancements in technology have improved screening quality while decreasing the need for additional images. In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of tomosynthesis or 3D screening mammography. Since then, multiple studies have found that 3D screenings have reduced the need to recall patients for additional images up to 17 percent.

Let’s face it: no cancer is a good cancer. But if you do get cancer, being diagnosed at Stage 0 might be considered a best-case scenario.

Despite their importance, there are all sorts of misconceptions and misinformation regarding mammograms that make it difficult to know when's the right time to schedule your screening.

Women at average risk for breast cancer should have an annual mammogram beginning at age 40.

You may have heard about a technology called 3D mammography. We get quite a few questions about it from patients in our Breast Center. It’s important to understand what 3D mammography is used for and who will benefit most from the technology.

Radioactive seed localization is an innovative procedure that is used to help your surgeon localize cancers and other breast abnormalities which are too small to feel.
At Roswell Park, we are specialists in cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment, and applying our capabilities to breast cancer screening is an important part of our mission.

Looking at the most recent cancer data released by the New York State Cancer Registry and the CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (2006-10), it appears that some counties in the Western New York area have higher-than-average breast cancer incidence rates when