Cancer Screening

“We’re reminding people to get their mammograms, their colorectal screenings and, for men, their prostate screenings.”
A recent article published by the National Cancer Institute reported that at least 50% of older adults had received at least one unnecessary cancer screening. Here's what you need to know.
While your risk for developing uterine cancer is dramatically lowered by the surgery, your risk for other gynecologic cancers — such as ovarian — may not be.
In late August, fans around the world were shocked by the unexpected death of “Black Panther” star Chadwick Boseman, who had not disclosed his four-year battle with colon cancer. His death shone a light on the fact that younger people, especially younger Black men and women, have a higher incidence of colorectal cancer — and a higher rate of death from the disease — than any other racial group in the United States.
Cancer survivors have a chance to share their stories and influence how doctors and researchers design cancer treatments, thanks to Roswell Park’s ROCKstars program.

About 5% of all Pap tests will be abnormal. An abnormal Pap test result does not mean cancer, but it does require follow-up to rule out the possibility of cancer.

As we mark National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, our Office of Community Outreach and Engagement wants you to be aware of six ways you can reduce your cancer risk.

The cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Learn the risk factors that increase the chance of developing this disease.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in New York State, which has one of the highest cancer rates in the country. More than 100,000 New Yorkers will be diagnosed with some type of cancer this year.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. It also happens to be one of the most preventable; however, the disease does not affect all people equally.

Understanding screening recommendations is just one of the many obstacles and challenges faced by transgender people when it comes to taking care of their health.

Across the board, the IUD is known to lower risk for many gynecological cancers, including endometrial and ovarian cancer, but with regard to cervical cancer, the latest research suggests the benefit can be significant.