Cancer Screening

Understanding screening recommendations is just one of the many obstacles and challenges faced by transgender people when it comes to taking care of their health.
The Anal Cancer Prevention Program works to ensure those with risk factors won’t delay their screenings. “If it’s caught early, it can really prevent the cancer from spreading and make treatment much easier.”
Colorectal cancer is curable if caught early, and the way to catch it early is through a colonoscopy.
"The mission of the COE is to assure that all cancer patients and communities in Western New York can benefit from, and have access to, all the clinical and scientific advances accomplished at Roswell Park.” 
Firefighters, in particular, and other first responders are at higher risk of developing myeloma, lymphoma and cancer in the breast, lungs, skin, liver, testes and other organs.
“We want to go from 70% of lung cancers being diagnosed when surgery is not an option to 70% diagnosed when most can be,” Dr. Reid says.
As of July 2021, Roswell Park can now treat any first responder whose cancer has been certified under the World Trade Center Health Program and have it covered by the federal program.
"Most lumps women feel are not cancer but it is important to have it evaluated with mammography and/or ultrasound because you cannot tell by how it feels whether it is cancer,” says Dr. Ermelinda Bonaccio.
“We’re reminding people to get their mammograms, their colorectal screenings and, for men, their prostate screenings.”
A recent article published by the National Cancer Institute reported that at least 50% of older adults had received at least one unnecessary cancer screening. Here's what you need to know.
While your risk for developing uterine cancer is dramatically lowered by the surgery, your risk for other gynecologic cancers — such as ovarian — may not be.
In late August, fans around the world were shocked by the unexpected death of “Black Panther” star Chadwick Boseman, who had not disclosed his four-year battle with colon cancer. His death shone a light on the fact that younger people, especially younger Black men and women, have a higher incidence of colorectal cancer — and a higher rate of death from the disease — than any other racial group in the United States.