Cancer Disparities

“We’re reminding people to get their mammograms, their colorectal screenings and, for men, their prostate screenings.”
New research led by two researchers at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center may lead to using immunotherapy in treating Black women with aggressive breast cancer.
What is the best way to get critical medical and health information to those who need it? Reach people where they are.

Roswell Park’s Christine Ambrosone, PhD, admits she may not have pursued the most conventional route to becoming a leading breast cancer researcher.

At Roswell Park, we are doing our part to help underserved patients gain access to life-saving treatments, manage the cost of care and navigate insurance red tape. We discussed our initiatives during the Buffalo Cancer Moonshot Summit, and we are dedicated to the national effort.

Although each tribe has its own unique history and culture, one thing all Native Americans have in common is an increased risk of cancer and other diseases, including diabetes, heart disease and obesity.

As we mark National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, our Office of Community Outreach and Engagement wants you to be aware of six ways you can reduce your cancer risk.

In Western New York and across the country, the Hispanic population is one of the fastest growing population groups. Puerto Ricans are the second largest Hispanic subgroup in the U.S., residing predominantly in the Northeast and along the east coast. In WNY, two-thirds (66.5 percent) of the Latino population is of Puerto Rican heritage. At Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, researchers are interested in knowing the cancer needs of local Hispanics and are conducting research to figure this out.

Historically, Japanese women were much less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than American women. However, as Western lifestyles become a part of everyday life in Japan, breast cancer rates are on the rise.

Roswell Park Cancer Institute is deeply committed to diversity and inclusion, and we are proud of the people, programs and processes that have enabled us to meet and exceed our goals. Here are just a few ways we are helping change the community!

"How did I feel after learning I had breast cancer? A feeling of loneliness,” says Maria Torres, a resident of Buffalo, New York and breast and cervical cancer survivor.

“I didn’t think I was going to make it, so it’s really about my life today and how cancer makes a difference in a person’s life,” said Thomasina Holmes, a thriving lung cancer survivor who credits Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center for saving her life.