Breast Cancer

A common sign of breast cancer is a lump in the breast area. But, what is the best way to detect a lump in your breast? If you find a lump, does it always mean you have cancer? Are breast cancer lumps painful?
Breast cancer that has spread to the lungs is not lung cancer, but metastatic breast cancer. It is treated using breast cancer therapy, regardless of where it has spread.
No one expects to get cancer. But when someone you love says they’ve got breast cancer, what do you do? 
Angela Eschrich, 64, and her daughter, Ashley, 36, have a lot in common. They both have boundless energy, stunning blue eyes, incredible courage and optimism, and — unbeknownst to them until two years ago — a BRCA2 gene mutation that greatly increases their risk of getting cancer.
Janice had passed a big milestone in her journey as a breast cancer survivor — the five-year mark — and figured going in for a six-year exam would be no big deal. She didn’t expect to be told the cancer had returned.
What is the best way to get critical medical and health information to those who need it? Reach people where they are.
“Yes, it is safe to get a mammogram during COVID-19, provided that both the patient and the facility have taken proper precautions to make the visit as risk-free as possible,” says Marie Quinn, MD, Director of Breast Imaging.
It is relatively uncommon for younger women — those who have not yet started menopause — to be diagnosed with breast cancer, says Ellis Levine, MD, Chief of Breast Medicine at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.
It’s OK to feel the feelings you have, it’s OK to be sad, but don’t dwell on it. Positivity breeds positivity. Attitude is everything.
BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes, meaning when they function normally their job is to keep tumors from forming. Some people however, have an altered or mutated copy of the gene and certain mutations are associated with an increased risk for several cancer types, including breast, ovarian, prostate, pancreatic, melanoma, and in some families, colorectal.

During the course of breast cancer treatment, a woman may decide, after discussion with her doctors, to have both of her breasts removed.

Roswell Park’s Christine Ambrosone, PhD, admits she may not have pursued the most conventional route to becoming a leading breast cancer researcher.