Breast Cancer

Pregnancy can be one of the most exciting and fulfilling times of a woman’s life. Although receiving a cancer diagnosis during this period of time is rare, it can, unfortunately, still happen. It is important for women to remain educated on cancer and how it relates to pregnancy.

As a surgeon in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery/Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, I work very closely with breast cancer patients to help educate them on their options and the benefits of

Every April, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center works to raise awareness about cancer among minority populations by recognizing National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, celebrated this year April 8-14, 2019.

Of the millions of women who get their mammogram each year, the vast majority will be told that their results are normal. However, if you do have an abnormal screening mammogram, you will need to undergo further testing.

It’s that time of year again. Pumpkin spice is everywhere, the leaves are crunching underfoot and the geese are flying for warmer weather.

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, my boyfriend Michael and I were still in the beginning stages of our relationship.

We asked some of Roswell Park’s doctors who specialize in cancers that affect women to share some tips for preventing or treating cancer. Here’s what they offered.
Research and patient advocacy revolutionized breast cancer care in the 1970s, giving women a greater voice in their treatment.
You may know someone who doesn’t wear deodorant or antiperspirant due to fear of an increased breast cancer risk. Are their concerns supported by scientific data? According to researchers, the answer is no.
What do you do when — after planning your life and working hard to achieve your dreams — your plans are interrupted by cancer?

Like many young women with hopes and dreams, Racine Walton had a lot to look forward to as she approached her 28th birthday.

Breast cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in African-American women, who are 41% more likely than white women to die of the disease.