Brain Tumor

Headaches are a very common ailment that most of the time are not a sign of something more serious. A lack of sleep, loud noise, brightness, even changing weather can cause a headache that, for the most part, can be cured with some rest or over-the-counter medicine.

Parents do everything they can to keep their children safe and secure. So when an unexpected cancer diagnosis hits, it’s scary to think that you might have passed your cancer risk along to your children. For almost 700,000 Americans living with a brain tumor, there’s one question: “Is it hereditary?”

The most common and well-known type of primary brain cancer in adults is glioblastoma, which is a highly aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease. Much less is known about low-grade gliomas, a group of primary brain cancers that most often develop in younger people during the prime of life, with an average age at diagnosis of only 37 years.

If you are diagnosed with a benign brain tumor, you’re not alone. About 700,000 Americans are living with a brain tumor, and 80% of primary brain tumors  — tumors that began in the brain and did not spread from somewhere else in the body — are benign. But if a tumor is not cancerous, do you have to do anything about it?

One spring day in 2012, Janice woke up with a horrible headache. Because her mom had had a brain aneurysm at a young age, Janice paid attention and called her husband. By dinnertime that day, she was coming out of brain surgery.

Our 2017 tree lighter, Mashayla, has a smile so bright that we expect it will steal the show and warm the hearts of all attendees (even if winter weather starts to come our way)!

I was told the tumor was inoperable and I had two years to live if I received chemotherapy and radiation. Just two years.

Find out what "orphan drug status" is and what it means for the cancer vaccine SurVaxM, currently under development at Roswell Park.

Last winter, I had a sudden-onset headache. My primary care physician sent me to a specialist, who ordered multiple scans, and the next thing I knew, I was being told I had a meningioma, a benign brain tumor.

During my own cancer journey, I’ve learned a lot about the importance of asking questions and getting multiple opinions. I had to be my own advocate to ensure the best possible care. Otherwise, my outcome might have been very different.

To help you begin to understand this complex group of tumors, we have compiled some of the key facts, statistics and information.