Dr. Pawel Kalinski Pawel Kalinski, MD, PhD

Pawel Kalinski

MD, PhD
Medical Oncology

Specializing In:

Biology of dendritic cells (DC) and DC vaccines Biology of T cells and T cell targeting therapies of cancer Biology of natural killer (NK) cells Biology of human myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) Regulation of chemokine production in tumor microenvironment (TME) TME and tumor-associated immune suppression In vitro modeling of human immune system Design and implementation of early phase clinical trials

Special Interests:

Development and clinical evaluation of new cancer involving the modulation of patients' immune system Role of the immune system in the effectiveness of chemo- and radiotherapy Promoting interactions between clinical and laboratory researchers Development and clinical evaluation of therapeutic vaccines involving different subsets of “polarized” DCs (colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, hematologic malignancies) Development and clinical evaluation of adoptive T cell therapies (ACT) using ex vivo-induced polyclonal CTLs (ovarian- & colorectal cancers and melanoma) Development and clinical evaluation of combinatorial approaches to enhance the effectiveness of vaccines, ACT an checkpoint blockers, but reprogramming tumor microenvironments for enhanced CTL infiltration and modulating intratumoral expression of PD-L1, Development of combinatorial adjuvants to modulate DC functions in situ Counteracting cancer-related immunosuppressive mechanisms and their use in transplantation and autoimmunity Role of the immune system in the effectiveness of oncolytic virotherapies Role of the immune system in the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy of cancer Interplay between stress and cancer immunity

About Pawel Kalinski

Biography:

The overall goal of my research is to advance the integration of immunotherapy within comprehensive cancer care, as a complementary modality to surgery, chemo and radiotherapy. My group develops new methods of using ex vivo-educated dendritic cells, DC-activated T cells, combinatorial adjuvants and checkpoint blockers, to promote selectively accumulation of type-1 immune cells (CTLs, Th1 and NK cells) in tumor lesions, without amplifying pre-existing Treg- and MDSC responses, in order to enhance local immune surveillance and enhance overall therapeutic outcomes. Our current projects include:

  • Development and clinical evaluation of therapeutic vaccines involving different subsets of “polarized” DCs (colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, hematologic malignancies)
  • Development and clinical evaluation of adoptive T cell therapies (ACT) using ex vivo-induced polyclonal CTLs (ovarian- & colorectal cancers and melanoma)
  • Development and clinical evaluation of combinatorial approaches to enhance the effectiveness of vaccines, ACT and checkpoint blockers, but reprogramming tumor microenvironments for enhanced CTL infiltration and modulating intratumoral expression of PD-L1, PD-L2 and other checkpoints (colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, bladder cancer, HPV-associated cancers)
  • Development of combinatorial adjuvants to modulate DC functions in situ
  • Counteracting cancer-related immunosuppressive mechanisms and their use in transplantation and autoimmunity
  • Role of the immune system in the effectiveness of oncolytic virotherapies
  • Role of the immune system in the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy of cancer
  • Interplay between psychologic stress and cancer immunity These interdisciplinary projects involving multiple clinical and laboratory teams, have been advanced as parts of the as multiple NIH-, DOD-, pharma and biotech-funded grants and program projects (single- and multi-institution P01s and P50/SPOREs; where I have been serving as the overall PI, overall co-PI or a Project Leader) and focusing on the therapy of melanoma, colon cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and hematologic malignancies. Our current work includes phase I/II and phase II clinical testing of the resulting paradigms and methods in cancer patients, and development of similar treatments for patients with premalignant lesions and chronic infections resistant to standard forms of treatment.

Positions

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Vice Chair for Translational Research, Department of Medicine
  • Director of Cancer Vaccine and Dendritic Cell Therapies, Center for Immunotherapy
  • Co-Leader, Tumor Immunology & Immunotherapy Program
  • Rustum Family Professor for Molecular Therapeutics and Translational Research
  • Professor of Oncology

Background

Education and Training:

  • 1991 - MD - Warsaw Medical Academy (AMW), Poland
  • 1998 - PhD - Immunology, University of Amsterdam (UvA), The Netherlands

Residency:

  • 1994 - Residency, Medicine, Ctr. Clin. Hosp. Milit. Sch. Med, Warsaw, Poland

Fellowship:

  • 2000 - Fellowship, Immunology, University of Amsterdam (UvA), The Netherlands
  • 1992 - Research Fellowship, Immunology, University of Amsterdam (UvA) The Netherlands

Professional Memberships:

  • 2015 - American Society of Clinical Investigation
  • 2011 - American Association for Cancer Research
  • 2009 - Society for Clinical and Translational Science
  • 2008 - Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer
  • 2004 - Society for Natural Immunity
  • 2001 - American Association of Immunologists

Featured on Cancer Talk


Publications

Full Publications list on PubMed
  • Kaliński P, Hilkens CM, Wierenga EA, Kapsenberg ML. T-cell priming by type-1 and type-2 polarized dendritic cells: the concept of a third signal. Immunol Today. 1999 Dec;20(12):561-7. doi: 10.1016/s0167-5699(99)01547-9. PMID: 10562707.
  • Mailliard RB, Wankowicz-Kalinska A, Cai Q, Wesa A, Hilkens CM, Kapsenberg ML, Kirkwood JM, Storkus WJ, Kalinski P. Alpha-type-1 polarized dendritic cells: a novel immunization tool with optimized CTL-inducing activity. Cancer Res. 2004 Sep 1;64(17):5934-7. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-04-1261. PMID: 15342370.
  • Okada H, Kalinski P, Ueda R, Hoji A, Kohanbash G, Donegan TE, Mintz AH, Engh JA, Bartlett DL, Brown CK, Zeh H, Holtzman MP, Reinhart TA, Whiteside TL, Butterfield LH, Hamilton RL, Potter DM, Pollack IF, Salazar AM, Lieberman FS. Induction of CD8+ T-cell responses against novel glioma-associated antigen peptides and clinical activity by vaccinations with {alpha}-type 1 polarized dendritic cells and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized by lysine and carboxymethylcellulose in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. J Clin Oncol. 2011 Jan 20;29(3):330-6. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2010.30.7744. Epub 2010 Dec 13. PMID: 21149657; PMCID: PMC3056467.
  • Muthuswamy R, Berk E, Junecko BF, Zeh HJ, Zureikat AH, Normolle D, Luong TM, Reinhart TA, Bartlett DL, Kalinski P. NF-κB hyperactivation in tumor tissues allows tumor-selective reprogramming of the chemokine microenvironment to enhance the recruitment of cytolytic T effector cells. Cancer Res. 2012 Aug 1;72(15):3735-43. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-4136. Epub 2012 May 16. PMID: 22593190; PMCID: PMC3780565.
  • Obermajer N, Wong JL, Edwards RP, Chen K, Scott M, Khader S, Kolls JK, Odunsi K, Billiar TR, Kalinski P. Induction and stability of human Th17 cells require endogenous NOS2 and cGMP-dependent NO signaling. J Exp Med. 2013 Jul 1;210(7):1433-445. doi: 10.1084/jem.20121277. PMID: 23797095; PMCID: PMC3698515.
  • Muthuswamy R, Okada NJ, Jenkins FJ, McGuire K, McAuliffe PF, Zeh HJ, Bartlett DL, Wallace C, Watkins S, Henning JD, Bovbjerg DH, Kalinski P. Epinephrine promotes COX-2-dependent immune suppression in myeloid cells and cancer tissues. Brain Behav Immun. 2017 May;62:78-86. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.02.008. Epub 2017 Feb 16. PMID: 28212885.

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