Treatments

Pancreatic cancer is called a silent killer because it often grows or spreads undetected. And like many cancers, it presents few warning signs. It’s critically important to educate patients about the options and the importance of early detection.

Roswell Park unveiled its brand new pharmacy this past spring, offering a convenient way for patients to retrieve prescriptions without having to make extra stops after leaving the hospital. However, the Roswell Park Pharmacy provides more than just convenience.
Radioactive seed localization is an innovative procedure that is used to help your surgeon localize cancers and other breast abnormalities which are too small to feel.
Understanding your illness is vital to making informed treatment decisions, and that begins with understanding the words related to a cancer diagnosis. Here are a few important words you should familiarize yourself with.

The most common malignant primary brain tumor is called glioblastoma multiforme. These tumors are often aggressive and infiltrate surrounding brain tissue.

Because 1 in 26 men will develop bladder cancer at some point in their lifetime, Roswell Park’s Center for Personalized Medicine is dedicated to finding a cure.

Cancer cells are smart. They adapt to defend against the drugs we use to treat them, and tumors can develop resistance to certain drugs over time. This can vary from patient to patient. Our research at Roswell Park is offering new ways to get around these issues.

Melanoma and soft tissue cancers are diseases in which prognosis is highly dependent on stage. Ninety to ninety-five percent of patients with early stage I diagnoses are completely cured with non-invasive treatment.

Following breast cancer removal by lumpectomy, whole breast irradiation is commonly required. We know that when breast cancer cells return after surgical removal, they often recur in the area where the tumor was removed.

What is often most difficult in the general treatment of lung cancers is understanding the specific complexities of each unique case. For decades, doctors and the medical community alike have lumped all lung cancers together as one entity.