smoking

Many tobacco smokers try using e-cigarettes as a way to cut back their cigarette smoking. Evidence has shown that e-cigarettes can be less harmful to a person’s health in the short-term when someone who regularly smokes completely switches to them, but they still deliver aerosols and other harmful chemicals.
Can non-smokers get lung cancer? Yes, they can; here’s what you need to know. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. In the United States, more people die every year of lung cancer than of the other major cancers – breast, prostate and colon – combined. 

Everyone knows that smoking cigarettes is dangerous. Smoking cigarettes kills more Americans than alcohol, car accidents, HIV, guns and illegal drugs combined and, according to the American Cancer Society, about half of all Americans who keep smoking will die from their addiction.

Some smokers — lured by the promise of a “safer” cigarette — switched to “light” cigarettes rather than quitting. But evidence strongly suggests that "light" cigarettes may actually increase a smoker’s risk of developing a type of non-small cell lung cancer called lung adenocarcinoma.

On March 10, 2013, it was all over. “The next morning when I got up, my mouth tasted like a dumpster. I didn’t want to know anything about nicotine for the rest of my life, honest to God.”