Sarcoma

The hours, days and weeks following a cancer diagnosis can be a whirlwind. Life-changing decisions will come at you fast, and things can be even more complicated if you have a rare cancer, such as a soft-tissue sarcoma.

Sarcoma is a rare cancer — accounting for just 1% of adult cancers — and it arises from the tissues that “glue” the body together — bone, muscle, fat, tendons, blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerves and joint tissue. If you or a loved one is diagnosed with a sarcoma, it’s important to understand what makes it different from the majority of cancers.

What is a sarcoma? What are the symptoms? What should you do if your primary care physician thinks you might have a sarcoma? Dr. Kane has the answers.

The fact that you live in a particular country or community should not impact your ability to get good care for cancer.

“Initially, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and some sarcomas are the three main targets,” says Dr. Koya, “but the clinical trial is open for patients with other cancers who meet the eligibility requirements."

I hope my story can help someone else, especially other young moms. So many people are depending on you, and it can feel so overwhelming. You’re tired and emotional, but you have to be strong in front of your kids. You don’t want them to worry, and that alone makes it doubly exhausting.

In addition to treating melanoma and sarcoma patients at Roswell Park, Joseph Skitzki, MD, FACS, spent the last few years developing a high-powered, first-of-its-kind microscope for use in the operating room. In February 2016, following a short study of the microscope’s functionality, Dr. Skitzki's research team revealed its stunning findings.

As a follow-up to my recent post on treatment options for advanced sarcoma, I wanted to highlight a few of the clinical trials we currently have open here at Roswell P

Soft tissue sarcoma is a type of cancer that begins in body tissue like fat, muscle, nerves or blood vessels.