Prostate-specific Antigen

“They’ll say, ‘When it gets bad, then you can see me.’ But when it gets bad, what decision will you make? What treatment will you get?”

You ask the internet a lot of questions, and Roswell Park has some answers. James Mohler, MD, Professor of Oncology, and Chair of the NCCN Prostate Cancer Guideline Committee, and Eric Kauffman, MD, Assistant Professor of Oncology, sat down to answer some of the internet's most-searched-for questions related to prostate cancer.

Richard Satterwhite doesn’t have any trouble remembering dates. Among those that will stay with him: Sept. 6, Oct. 24 and Dec. 14. These are the dates that Richard associates with milestones in his experience with prostate cancer.

One of the most well-known—and controversial—methods of cancer detection is the PSA test. PSA stands for prostate-specific antigen, the marker in blood that can indicate the presence of prostate cancer.