Lymphoma

At every one of her bi-monthly appointments, Prudie bakes something for the Lymphoma Clinic staff, accompanied by a handwritten thank-you card to acknowledge all that they have done for her.
“I keep telling my kids, ‘I’m here for a reason.’” 
"It felt like my whole world was turned upside down. No 23-year-old expects something like this would happen to them.”
"There was only one place I knew that could take good care of me, so I called up Roswell. They asked, 'Who referred you?' and I said, I did!"
“It’s so easy, I feel like I’m getting away with something.” That’s how Nella Smolinksi describes the last three years of treatment with an immunotherapy drug to control her rare form of Hodgkin lymphoma.
Your skin can be the site of a type of cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), which can look like eczema or psoriasis, causing scaly or itchy lesions and plaques that cause irritation.
“I’m so grateful to have Roswell Park. It is such a great facility. It’s all about beating the disease there. And for the constant support of Gwen and our family. I don’t know where I’d be without them.”

The fact that you live in a particular country or community should not impact your ability to get good care for cancer.

As a young adult cancer patient, I craved a sense of normality. Going to work every day helped me maintain my routine, and for 8 hours, I tricked myself into believing nothing was out of the ordinary.

I was 27-years-old and went to my primary care doctor for a sore shoulder and a cough that only happened when I laughed. Given a recent backpacking trip, it made sense when his initial diagnosis was a shoulder strain. But as an extra precaution, he ordered a chest x-ray. That’s when he found the mass under my sternum, near my heart.

As a 25-year cancer survivor, a “veteran” if you will, there is a natural tendency for newly diagnosed cancer patients to gravitate toward me. After all, I’ve “been there done that.”

Lymphoma is a cancer that starts in the infection-fighting cells of the immune system, called lymphocytes. These cells are in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and other parts of the body. There are many types of lymphoma, and the risk factors vary.