Giving

On June 23, 2019, Ted Rung crossed the Ride for Roswell finish line, completing the 100-mile route. No small feat for a 31-year-old who had just fought cancer for the third time.

Out in Roswell Park’s front circle, Kim Sweeney and Chris Dibble are helping unload stacks of pizza boxes from a delivery van. The sheet pizzas are a donation providing lunch for Roswell Park’s frontline workers.

Single dad Chris Bosley is currently in his second monthlong stay at Roswell Park for treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). During his first hospitalization, back in December, he saw his parents every day and, best of all, his son three times a week.

In 2019, multiple myeloma patient Karen was feeling anxious about her upcoming bone marrow transplant (BMT). As an RN, she wonders if her anxiety was even worse than what other patients felt.

We are living in a global event most of us could not have imagined even a few weeks ago. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented changes in all our lives, with profound upheavals in family, social, financial and work situations.

“The phoenix represents the stories of survival I’ve heard at Roswell Park,” says Joe Garguilo, a member of the Creative Arts Team. Inspired by the idea, he invites patients and survivors to pick up a brush and fill in the outstretched wings with colors and words of healing.

If you’re a cancer patient in Western New York and are losing your hair due to cancer treatment, you may choose a wig from the Wig & Hat Boutique in Roswell Park’s Resource Center for Patients and Families. Here's how.

Only when her doctors told her she was going to die without one did Rachel understand how critical a bone marrow transplant was. Just two months before hearing these words, the RN had rarely been sick a day in her life.

“Look what we’ve started. This is so exciting.”

"When I walk into the gallery and connect with a work of art, it becomes a spiritual experience for me."

Roswell Park patients who become ill with non-life-threatening symptoms outside of regular clinic hours no longer have to seek care at an emergency room at another hospital.

Not all patients respond to all types of immunotherapies. So how can doctors identify which treatments have the best chance of working in a specific patient? How can they quickly zero in on the best options on a list of immunotherapies that grows longer every day?