Colorectal Cancer

Christine, who lives with her husband, William, and their three children, Jackson, 18, Bella, 15, and Livi, 13, in Ellicottville, New York, learned she had colorectal cancer in 2016.

Every April, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center works to raise awareness about cancer among minority populations by recognizing National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, celebrated this year April 8-14, 2019.

More than 50,000 people die of colorectal cancer each year — but the death rate is on a steady decline, and the American Cancer Society projects that the 2020 death rate will be 50% lower than the 2000 rate.

“Am I pooping enough? Why is my poop green?” Seemingly silly questions like these are, in fact, important to understanding your body. The bowel movement chart below will help you decode your stool and discover helpful insights into your health. Keep in mind that everyone’s body is different and only a medical professional can evaluate your individual symptoms and observations.

In many patients, the ostomy is temporary and can be reversed after the intestines have healed. This surgery is less complicated than the original surgery.

We asked some of Roswell Park’s doctors who specialize in cancers that affect women to share some tips for preventing or treating cancer. Here’s what they offered.

While some risk factors, including a genetic predisposition for disease, cannot be controlled, research has shown certain lifestyle factors, like a healthy diet, exercise and maintaining a healthy body weight, could prevent nearly half of the cases of colorectal cancers diagnosed in the United States every year.

Even if tumors are detected after they become cancerous, colorectal cancer is still very treatable and slow to develop. Patients can take some time to decide which treatments are best for their situation and shouldn’t feel like they need to rush into an immediate treatment decision.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in both men and women. Although it is slightly more common in men, 1 in every 24 women will be diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer at some point in her life.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. It also happens to be one of the most preventable; however, the disease does not affect all people equally.

It made me cry when Brendan told me why he wanted to go Bald. He knows how important it is. He’s only eight and knows how important it is to find cancer cures.

June is Men’s Health Month, a time when we focus on increasing awareness of preventable health problems to encourage men to take more active roles in preventing disease and detecting and treating problems early.