Clinical Trials

“The immune system is a powerful tool, and only in the last decade have we really begun to tap into its potential as a cancer-fighting powerhouse,” Dr. Puzanov says.
“Cancer patients have to be warriors all the time, but I don’t consider myself one. I had a lot of help from everyone at Roswell — the positivity from everyone at the front desk, the nurses and everyone I met."
“Other than a shot once a month, I’m in no pain,“ Judi says. “Instead, I’ve already lived three years longer than I thought I would at the beginning of this diagnosis. I’m happy to be alive and feeling well, and one day, I hope to ring that Victory Bell at Roswell Park.”

Dr. Wang and her Roswell Park colleagues travel the world to identify new clinical trials for leukemia for our patients at Roswell Park. "Our patients should have access to the same trials as patients in Boston, New York, Chicago and San Francisco."

Dr. Lee says hopes are high for the success of immunotherapies targeting multiple myeloma: “I think we’re seeing a major change in the way we take care of the disease.”

In 2012, Laurie Rich, PhD, arrived at Roswell Park to begin his doctoral work under the mentorship of Mukund Seshadri, PhD, DDS, Chair of Oral Oncology. He arrived at the same time as a very important piece of equipment, and as some crucial research was taking place.

Many different kinds of psychological interventions can help cancer patients deal with the physical and emotional symptoms of cancer and its treatment. One type of intervention that has shown great promise is mindfulness, and a mindfulness study is now open at Roswell Park for patients with advanced breast cancer.

Roswell Park is one of very few institutions in the United States equipped to offer clinical trials of a full range of immunotherapies. How do these treatments work, and what new immunotherapy clinical trials are underway or close to being launched?

Clinical trials are a key reason why childhood cancer treatments and survival rates have improved significantly in recent years.

“Initially, ovarian cancer, melanoma, and some sarcomas are the three main targets,” says Dr. Koya, “but the clinical trial is open for patients with other cancers who meet the eligibility requirements."

Collected last week from a patient with late-stage ovarian cancer, these are not ordinary T cells; they have been altered and multiplied in the hope that when they are given back to her, they will launch a devastating attack on her cancer cells.

Find out what "orphan drug status" is and what it means for the cancer vaccine SurVaxM, currently under development at Roswell Park.