Second Opinion

Biopsies are fundamental to diagnosing cancer and monitoring results of its treatment. Patients awaiting the outcome of a cancer biopsy face having an enormous weight being put on – or lifted from – their shoulders.

“Before you begin treatment, you should feel good knowing that you have done your due diligence, you are confident that you have received the correct diagnosis, and you are comfortable with your medical team and your treatment plan,” says Dr. Frederick.
"They said I wasn't a candidate for surgery, and that I needed three more months of chemo, which I couldn't tolerate. They made me feel like I wouldn’t live very long. When I asked what I should do, they told me I should call hospice." Then Romaine’s primary doctor sent her to Roswell Park for a second opinion.
The internet brings you the world of information with a touch or a click. In the U.S., tens of millions of people — about one in three of us — use the internet to seek health information. How can you tell if a website or its content is trustworthy?

When you’re diagnosed with cancer, it can feel as if your whole life has been turned upside down. During this confusing, scary time, it’s completely normal to want to take action quickly to get rid of the disease.

During my own cancer journey, I’ve learned a lot about the importance of asking questions and getting multiple opinions. I had to be my own advocate to ensure the best possible care. Otherwise, my outcome might have been very different.

Hearing “you have cancer” usually triggers a range of emotions in people that may include anxiety, sadness, anger, fear, confusion and a sense of urgency to have the cancer treated as soon as possible.