HPV

You ask the Internet a lot of questions, and Roswell Park has some answers.

A cancer diagnosis inspires many questions, and in a search for answers, patients and family members often stumble on misleading or inaccurate information that raises even more questions, such as — is cancer contagious?
We know that cancers related to HPV (human papillomavirus) are common, on the rise and, for more than a decade, preventable. Roswell Park teams specializing in cancer prevention and ways to eliminate health disparities have spent a lot of time trying to understand a dynamic we’ve observed — why aren’t more families taking advantage of HPV vaccination, a powerful opportunity to prevent some very serious and possibly fatal cancers before they develop?

The study found that more than 42 percent of U.S. adults ages 18 to 59 have a type of genital HPV and nearly 23 percent of adults are infected with strains of the virus that carry a higher risk of causing cancer. CDC and Roswell Park recommend getting adolescents and young adults vaccinated. 

A new study has sounded the alarm about the impact of cervical cancer on women of color. According to the study, published in the journal Cancer, the death toll among African-American women is similar to that of women living in poor, developing countries.

All three of my kids got all their shots. Every stinging needle, every dose was dutifully administered as a normal part of their childhood. I felt that getting their vaccinations was my responsibility as their parent, just like getting them on the school bus, feeding them at least three times a day and trying to limit their television and internet time.

HPV (Human Papillomavirus) is the most common sexually transmitted virus in the United States. However, some things you hear about HPV may not be true. Educate yourself with the facts in this blog.

The human papillomavirus, or HPV, continues to be a preventable cause of many cancer cases across the globe. The most common type of cancer associated with HPV is cervical cancer, but it can also cause anal, vaginal, vulvar, penile and some kinds of throat cancer.

April is Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Month—the perfect time to learn more about your risk factors. Unlike a mammogram, a PSA test, or other routine cancer screenings, oral cancer screening is something most people don’t think to ask about at the doctor’s office.