Survivorship

Cat is a graduate student, a dog owner, an academic fraternity member and much more. Nothing can slow her down – not even a cancer diagnosis.

Three days after Emily’s 19th birthday, she received the devastating news that she had stage 3 malignant melanoma, one of the most serious forms of skin cancer. She was given less than a 59 percent chance of surviving the next five years. In a state of shock, she felt her only options were fight or flight – to face her diagnosis head-on or to live in fear – and she chose to fight.

Hank found ways to not be intimidated by his diagnosis. Although he is young, he knows about and understands exactly what is going on with his diagnosis and treatment. Being informed helps Hank feel more comfortable.

In April 2016, a “spot” was discovered on Bonnie Hewett’s liver during a pelvic examination. “It was really found by fluke,” says Bonnie. Her internist advised her to have the spot checked out and Bonnie turned to Roswell Park.

Roswell Park is excited to host Alejandro Chaoul, PhD, as the keynote speaker at "Chapter 2: A Cancer Survivor's Workshop”. In the Q&A Feature, Dr. Chaoul shares how he got his start in mind-body practices and how integrative medicine can help cancer patients and survivors.

As a 25-year cancer survivor, a “veteran” if you will, there is a natural tendency for newly diagnosed cancer patients to gravitate toward me. After all, I’ve “been there done that.”

The news that you are cancer-free can stir up many feelings — relief, exhaustion, excitement, apprehension — and you may wonder what happens next. Although you and your loved ones have worked toward and hoped for this outcome, there are many aspects of survivorship, and it may take time to adjust to life after treatment.

Although Alexis is only 9 years old, cancer has been a part of her young life for nearly three years. Long trips from Jamestown to Roswell Park for treatment are not easy, but she finds ways to stay positive by listening to her favorite music, staying active and embracing those around her.

If you’ve completed your cancer treatment — whether recently or years ago — congratulations! The opening of Roswell Park’s new Survivorship and Supportive Care Center means you’ll now enjoy one-stop shopping for the follow-up care and services you need to “live your best life” as a survivor.

In the United States, hair and beauty are multibillion-dollar industries, with the average woman spending about $50,000 on her hair over a lifetime. Clearly, good hair days are important and for most women, play a strong role in personal identity, self-confidence and the image presented to the world. So when patients begin treatment for cancer, the concern over hair loss sits front and center on the list of side effects that are likely to become an important part of their experience.

When a co-worker reveals that they are battling cancer, it can be difficult to know what to say or how to act.

Most cancer survivors will tell you they have two extremely vivid memories: the moment they received their diagnosis and the moment they finally finished treatment. However, in between, and for people who may never finish treatment, there are many types of victories worth celebrating.