Breast Cancer Screening

“We’re reminding people to get their mammograms, their colorectal screenings and, for men, their prostate screenings.”
For some women, routine mammograms are showing swollen lymph nodes in the upper arm and armpit area on the side where they’ve received their vaccine. But that’s not a reason to be alarmed.
A common sign of breast cancer is a lump in the breast area. But, what is the best way to detect a lump in your breast? If you find a lump, does it always mean you have cancer? Are breast cancer lumps painful?
“Yes, it is safe to get a mammogram during COVID-19, provided that both the patient and the facility have taken proper precautions to make the visit as risk-free as possible,” says Marie Quinn, MD, Director of Breast Imaging.
It is relatively uncommon for younger women — those who have not yet started menopause — to be diagnosed with breast cancer, says Ellis Levine, MD, Chief of Breast Medicine at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center.
Breast cancer survivors, survivors of other types of cancer and people who have never had cancer all have different needs when it comes to breast cancer screening. Here’s what you need to know.

Of the millions of women who get their mammogram each year, the vast majority will be told that their results are normal. However, if you do have an abnormal screening mammogram, you will need to undergo further testing.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in New York State, which has one of the highest cancer rates in the country. More than 100,000 New Yorkers will be diagnosed with some type of cancer this year.

Ambrosone and her team discovered something astonishing: African-American women who breastfed their babies did not have an increased risk of ER-negative breast cancer.

On a mammogram, fat looks dark grey or black whereas breast tissue looks white. That white area can be an issue because many small breast cancers also appear as white, so it’s harder to detect them in dense breasts.

Let’s face it: no cancer is a good cancer. But if you do get cancer, being diagnosed at Stage 0 might be considered a best-case scenario.

Despite their importance, there are all sorts of misconceptions and misinformation regarding mammograms that make it difficult to know when's the right time to schedule your screening.