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Roswell Park’s Dr. Odunsi discusses immunotherapeutic approaches using tryptophan at national conference
Monday, February 27, 2017

Tryptophan has long been known for its role in producing serotonin, which promotes a good night’s sleep. But researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute are exploring a new mechanism for the amino acid, which supports the immune system’s efforts to fight cancer. Kunle Odunsi, MD, PhD, FRCOG, FACOG, who is Deputy Director, M. Steven Piver Professor and Chair of the Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Executive Director of the Center for Immunotherapy at Roswell Park, will present results from novel research on the role of tryptophan in tumor development at the Frontiers in Cancer Immunotherapy symposium, to be held Feb. 27–28 in New York City.

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Roswell Park Public Affairs

Annie Deck-Miller
Senior Media Relations Manager
716-845-8593
Annie.Deck-Miller@roswellpark.org
Deb Pettibone
Public Information Specialist
716-845-4919
Deborah.Pettibone@roswellpark.org

Roswell Park Alliance Foundation

Amy Biber
Director, Development Marketing And Communications
716-845-1038
Amy.Biber@RoswellPark.org

 

News In Brief

Thursday, November 3, 2016
Immunotherapy, which uses the body’s own immune system to fight disease, is transforming the treatment of several types of cancers. Severe adverse effects can result from these groundbreaking cancer treatments, however, and when they do, it’s important to recognize and quickly address them, researchers write in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Cancer Talk Blog

Monday, February 27, 2017 - 3:01pm

Lymphoma is a cancer that starts in the infection-fighting cells of the immune system, called lymphocytes. These cells are in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and other parts of the body. There are many types of lymphoma, and the risk factors vary.

Having one or more risk factor does not mean that you will develop lymphoma. Most people who have an increased risk never develop the disease. However, It's important to know your family and medical history and recognize any genetic factors.  

Hodgkin lymphoma risk factors:

RPCI in the News

Sunday, February 26, 2017
Sunday, February 26, 2017