Roswell Park Newsroom

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Roswell Park Public Affairs

Annie Deck-Miller
Senior Media Relations Manager
716-845-8593
Annie.Deck-Miller@roswellpark.org
Deb Pettibone
Public Information Specialist
716-845-4919
Deborah.Pettibone@roswellpark.org

Roswell Park Alliance Foundation

Amy Biber
Director, Development Marketing And Communications
716-845-1038
Amy.Biber@RoswellPark.org

 

News In Brief

Thursday, November 3, 2016
Immunotherapy, which uses the body’s own immune system to fight disease, is transforming the treatment of several types of cancers. Severe adverse effects can result from these groundbreaking cancer treatments, however, and when they do, it’s important to recognize and quickly address them, researchers write in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Tuesday, November 1, 2016
How to harness the immune system to improve the outcome of ovarian cancer patients was the focus of a presentation by Kunle Odunsi, MD, PhD, Deputy Director of Roswell Park Cancer Institute, at the 16th Biennial Meeting of the International Gynecologic Cancer Society in Lisbon, Portugal.
Friday, October 28, 2016
The first comprehensive study analyzing follow-up care among childhood cancer survivors concludes that fewer than than half of the adult survivors of childhood cancers — who remain at greater risk for chronic illnesses — receive adequate long-term follow-up care.

Cancer Talk Blog

Monday, February 27, 2017 - 3:01pm

Lymphoma is a cancer that starts in the infection-fighting cells of the immune system, called lymphocytes. These cells are in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and other parts of the body. There are many types of lymphoma, and the risk factors vary.

Saturday, February 25, 2017 - 9:00am

If you have coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation or any other heart condition, what does this mean for you if you have cancer? It means you should seek a consultation with a cardio-oncologist.

Friday, February 24, 2017 - 10:41am

You may not realize it, but your body is home to a lot of microbes — way more than you might think. In healthy humans, “microbial cells outnumber human cells by about ten to one,” according to the Human Microbiome Project of the National Institutes of Health. Most of them, called gut flora, live in your digestive system, especially in the colon. Others live in distinct communities in and on your body,  in different types of environments — hot or cold, moist or dry.

RPCI in the News

Sunday, February 26, 2017
Sunday, February 26, 2017