Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Blood Cancer


Study Number
40916
Phase
2
Purpose

This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient?s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.

Full Title

A PHASE II TRIAL OF HAPLOIDENTICAL ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION UTILIZING MOBILIZED PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELLS.

ClinicalTrials.Gov ID
NCT03333486

To inquire about participating in these studies, call 1-800-ROSWELL (1-800-767-9355) or e-mail askroswell@roswellpark.org.