Archive - July 2013

Monday, July 29, 2013 - 2:34pm

Video games get a bad rap for enabling a couch-potato mentality. But for adolescent and young adult cancer patients, gaming could be just what the doctor ordered.

There’s nothing new about video games being used for non-entertainment purposes such as education or exercise. But researchers are acknowledging the addictive properties of gameplay and how these features may factor into medical research.

Friday, July 26, 2013 - 3:12pm

Many people believe the fight against cancer begins at diagnosis. Actually, it starts well before that with exercise, healthy lifestyle choices and diet. Proper nutrition is a preventative anti-cancer foundation. The benefits are complex, but the steps to getting those benefits are deliciously simple.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 10:57am

Last May, after severe leg pain drove 23-year-old Kevan Busa to the emergency room in Syracuse, N.Y., he learned that he had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Without treatment, doctors said, he wouldn’t live two weeks.

Kevan’s world as he knew it dissolved in an instant. His brain raced as he wrestled with the idea that the disease might cut his life short. On top of that, everything he had worked for was slipping away. His summer internship — finished. Plans to spend the fall semester in Spain — over.

Thursday, July 11, 2013 - 8:57am

Squamous cell carcinoma hit the local spotlight last month when former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly announced his diagnosis, isolated in his upper jaw. About 55,000 Americans will be diagnosed with this disease in 2013.

The diagnosis left many people curious about this type of cancer. Even though I personally did not treat Jim Kelly’s case, I want to share some information about squamous cell carcinoma, including who may be at risk, what to watch for and the importance of early detection.

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 8:12am

If you heard hoofbeats, what animal would you think of? A horse, right? It’s the most obvious answer. Unfortunately in the medical world not all diagnoses are horses, or the most likely possibility, and sometimes physicians need to look for the zebra, or the less likely scenario, when making a diagnosis. In the cancer world, neuroendocrine tumors are the zebras. Represented by this analogy because of their rarity, neuroendocrine tumors make up just 2% of nationally treated cancers.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 9:44am

Cancer is a life-altering experience. The body, mind and spirit undergo a great deal of stress that can raise questions about the future and human existence — What is the meaning of life? Why are we here?