Cancer Talk

Thursday, July 25, 2019 - 11:17am
“We have to be really careful about health and diet and exercise, and keeping lean. If glucose can drive cancer growth, then patients with esophageal cancer probably have to be careful about their diet, their glucose intake, and make sure they're speaking to their medical professionals to get advice.”
Doctor examines spot on patients skin.
Monday, July 22, 2019 - 4:27pm
The skin is the largest organ in the body, and skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. There are three main types of skin cancer: squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and melanoma. Of these, melanoma is the most dangerous.
Tuesday, July 16, 2019 - 4:45pm

When it comes to skin cancer, we have some good news and some bad news.

Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 1:59pm
Patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that did not respond to treatment or that came back after two previous treatments had few remaining options — until now.
Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - 1:44pm
The hours, days and weeks following a cancer diagnosis can be a whirlwind. Life-changing decisions will come at you fast, and it may be challenging to understand your diagnosis and what you should expect moving forward. Things can be even more complicated if you have a rare cancer, such as a soft-tissue sarcoma.
Friday, July 5, 2019 - 9:30am

A cancer diagnosis and the treatment that follows can be very stressful for patients and their loved ones.

Monday, July 1, 2019 - 1:49pm

The mouth (oral cavity) is one of the most easily accessible regions in our body. Yet sadly, oral and head and neck cancers referred to as squamous cell carcinomas are often detected in the advanced stages.

Friday, June 28, 2019 - 9:40am

Each year, more than 30,000 people in the United States receive an organ transplant. If you or a loved one received a transplant, you know that you must be vigilant and watch for symptoms of organ rejection or organ failure.

Friday, June 21, 2019 - 9:00am
The internet brings you the world of information with a touch or a click. In the U.S., tens of millions of people — about one in three of us — use the internet to seek health information. How can you tell if a website or its content is trustworthy?